HIV Projects

Long term outcomes of therapy in women initiated on lifelong ART because of pregnancy

This is a 5 years projects with two phases: 1) The first which started on June 2016 is observational and aim to identify midifiable health delivery system factors associated with retention incare and sustained virological suppression in HIV-infected women receiving care in maternal and child health (MCH) clinics. We are using surveys of health facilities, including selected staff, and service beneficiaries (HIV infected mothers) to collect data on key characteristics of the service delivery’s organization and providers’ and patients’ perspective of the HIV care delivery performance. Proportional odds models will be used to identify key modifiable characteristics associated with the main outcomes (LTFU, virological suppression, and MTCT rate). 2) The second phase will use a cluster randomized controlled design to evaluate the effectiveness of Continuous Quality Iimprovement interventions in improving long-term retention in care and virological suppression in HIV-infected women in MCH clinics. MCH clinics in the intervention group, will undergo quality improvement initiatives using participatory data-driven approaches and on-site monitoring and supervisory support. Randomization is expected in July-August 2017. Overall, 3000 HIV-infected women and their exposed infants will be enrolled during the first two and half years of the project and follow-up for a minimum of two years.

Collaborating Institutions

The Ohio University's College of Public Health (USA); Kinshasa School of Public Health (DR Congo); National AIDS Program (DR Congo); Salvation Army and the Bureau Diocésain des Œuvres Médicales de Kinshasa: BDOM (DR Congo)

Funding

This work is supported by a grant from NIH EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT. Grant #: 1R01 HD087993

International Epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IEDEA), Central Africa Region

This is a multi-partner, multi-center project to combine data on cohorts of patients receiving HIV care and treatment in the Central Africa region (CA-IeDEA). In addition to lead the pediatric and PMTCT activities for the region, I facilite as country PI participation of sites from Democratic Republic of Congo and the Republic of Congo. I also serve as the CA-IeDEA representative in global IeDEA on project related to Tuberculosis and Pediatric HIV. If you are interested in using IeDEA data, you simply have to complete a concept sheet and submit.

Collaborating Institutions

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York (USA); City University of New York (USA); The Ohio State University, Columbus (USA).

Funding

This work is supported by a grant from National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Grant #: 7U01 AI096299                                               

Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) to Increase Uptake of Prenvention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) Services

A randomized control trial to: 1) test whether small, increasing cash payments to HIV-infected pregnant women (on the condition that they attend scheduled clinic visits and receive proposed services) will increase the proportion of women who receive the most effective antiretroviral (ARV) regimen they are eligible for by the time of delivery; and 2) reveal factors that facilitate or inhibit the uptake and adherence to the PMTCT cascade, and to what extent the CCT program addresses these factors.

This study is currently closed, 475 newly diagnosed HIV-infected pregnant women were enrolled and followed-up with until six weeks after delivery.  The last follow-up visit for the study was completed  in August 2016 and the main results from the study have been published.

http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01838005

Collaborating Institutions

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA); Kinshasa School of Public Health (DRC); National AIDS Program; Salvation Army and the Bureau Diocésain des Œuvres Médicales de Kinshasa (BDOM)

Funding

This work is supported by a grant from NIH EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT. Grant #: 5R01HD075171