Funded Research Proposals

JaNelle Ricks, Assistant Professor in the Division of Health Behavior and Health Promotion, Kathryn Lancaster, Assistant Professor in the Division of Epidemiology and Jose Rodriguez, Director of External Relations and Strategic Initiatives received an Opioid Innovation Fund grant entitled "Development of a Community and Social Network-Based Campaign to Reduce Opioid-Related Stigma and Overdose" from The Ohio State University in the amount of $45,541.50.

Abstract
Ohio currently leads the country in opioid-related overdose deaths. The objective of this project is to develop a bold and clear structural and social network-based opioid overdose reversal campaign within Central Ohio. This campaign will educate people who inject drugs (PWID), their friends and family, and broader community about the opioid overdose reversal medication naloxone, how to recognize and respond to an overdose, and how to access medical and community- based training and other resources. To develop this campaign, we will a) engage the services of a professional marketing firm, and b) engage the partnership of Equitas Health and other local medical centers, local TV affiliates NBC 4 and ABC 6, grassroots advocacy groups such as The Addict's Parents United, and peer group leaders from diverse Central Ohio communities. Specifically, we will use a mixed methods approach to: 1) examine structural and social level barriers, facilitators, and attitudes towards opioid overdose and reversal; 2) develop message content, characteristics, and media delivery channels for an opioid overdose reversal campaign; and 3) pilot a peer group leader (PGL)-delivered social network-based strategy to promote opioid reversal medication. Upon completion of this planning project, we will have designed and piloted a structural and social network-based overdose reversal campaign that can be expanded to include harm reduction messaging and rigorously evaluated to determine the effectiveness on opioid related overdose and other co-morbidities within central Ohio.

Kathryn Lancaster, Assistant Professor in the Division of Epidemiology and Julianna Nemeth, Assistant Professor of Practice in the Division of Health Behavior and Health Promotion received an Opioid Innovation Fund grant entitled "Building Recommended Practices for Working with Domestic Violence Survivors Who Use Opioids in Residential Services: A Community Engagement Approach" from The Ohio State University in the amount of $50,000.

Abstract
The current opioid epidemic has had an enormous impact on domestic violence (DV) agencies and survivors. Ohio’s agencies serving DV survivors in a residential setting currently lack state-wide guidance on better addressing the needs of survivors who struggle with opioid addiction, while also providing a safe and healing environment. Our interdisciplinary research team, in collaboration with the Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN)—the federally recognized statewide coalition of Ohio’s 72 DV service providers—is proposing a needs assessment-planning project to address opioid issues in service provision. The first component of the project will entail conducting 6 focus groups with DV agencies’ staff (n=60) at a statewide summit hosted by ODVN. Information will be obtained regarding challenges DV residential programs face when working with survivors using opioids and the types of support needed to better address opioid issues in service provision. Provisions will be made in order to secure a diverse and representative sample of Ohio’s DV programs and to investigate the unique needs of agencies providing services in rural and urban settings. The second component will entail conducting phone interviews with survivors (N=150) to examine prevalence estimates of opioid use of DV survivors in shelters. Overall, findings will aid in the development of program recommendations on addressing the burden of opioid use among DV survivors accessing residential services.

Thomas Huber, Assistant Professor in the Division of Health Services Management and Policy received an Opioid Innovation Fund grant entitled "Developing a Community-Based Integrated Care Delivery Model for Opioid Use Disorder (OUD)" from The Ohio State University in the amount of $50,000.

Abstract
The opioid epidemic is a multifaceted crisis that requires the coordination and collaboration between front-line stakeholders in both public safety and healthcare sectors. Most current strategies center on the immediate crisis of opioid overdose and short-term survival (including expanded access to naloxone), rather than addressing the challenge of person centered care coordination. Through this strategy, people who survive an opioid overdose are still at high risk for relapse and death without access to continued care to facilitate recovery. Since patients receive acute care services for opioid overdose and/or withdrawal at various health and public sectors, many face challenges with post-overdose follow up and referral with high rates of relapse for OUD. Patients are often left to navigate a complex disjointed web of resources on their own both before and after relapse. Our overarching goal is to better understand ways to facilitate recovery for patients suffering from opioid use disorder. There is a critical need to understand how patients seeking to recover from opioid addiction understand their overdose/relapse process, describe what frontline personnel know about this population, and to identify where barriers and opportunities for enhanced coordination and care planning exist. Therefore, the specific aims for the project are: (1) Create a process map of the patient flow immediately 48 hours before and after access to acute care (emergency medical services (EMS), emergency department( ED), detoxification centers (DC), and police and fire (P/F)) for opioid overdose/ withdrawal to prevent relapse and support longterm recovery. (2) Build a Community-Based Integrated Care Delivery Model for Acute Episodes and Crises that addresses gaps, barriers, and best practices surrounding overdose and relapse events.

Ayaz Hyder, Assistant Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences received an Opioid Innovation Fund grant entitled "Franklin County Opioid Crisis Activity Levels (FOCAL) Map" from The Ohio State University in the amount of $96,762.

Abstract
Franklin County residents affected by opiate addiction/dependence urgently need resources for recovery and treatment. Our pilot research has identified areas of high overdose rates with no or limited access to recovery centers, which we term recovery deserts. The goal of this proposal is to build on this work and implement a system to collate, track, and map, on a daily basis, data on opiate overdoses from the 22 EMS organizations in Franklin County. This will be done in partnership with the Central Ohio Trauma System (COTS), which currently manages a trauma data registry for all Franklin County hospitals, which includes EMS trauma data submitted by the hospitals as required by the Ohio Department of Public Safety. This proposal will achieve two goals: 1) improve access to real time data for Ohio State and community partners, which will allow us to determine the impact of any planned interventions and 2) work with community partners in Columbus Public Health and treatment providers to plan further outreach to those in recovery desert areas.

Tory Hogan, Assistant Professor in the Division of Health Services Management and Policy, received a Crisafi-Monte Endowment Grant through the College of Medicine in the amount of $50,000.

Ashley Felix, Assistant Professor in the Division of Epidemiology, received a Cancer Control Program Seed Grant entitled, "A Pilot Study to Assess Patient-Reported Outcomes Among Endometrial Cancer Patients" from the OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center in the amount of $19,445.

Liz Klein, Associate Professor in the Division of Health Behavior and Health Promotion, received a subaward from Nationwide Children's Hospital as part of its CDC award entitled, "Center for Injury Research and Policy" in the amount of $46,628.

Amy Ferketich, Professor in the Division of Epidemiology, recently received an award from the Ohio Department of Health entitled "Tobacco disparities demonstration project" in the amount of $161,544.

Brittney Francis, Graduate Fellow in Public Health, recently received a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Research Scholar Award in the amount of $120,000.

Maria Gallo, Associate Professor in the Division of Epidemiology, recently received a Society of Family Planning award entitled "Debunking myths about contraceptive safety among women in Kingston, Jamaica: randomized controlled trial" in the amount of $120,000.

Ayaz Hyder, Assistant Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, recently received an Innovation Lab Award from SUNY Buffalo to attend the "Radical Solutions to the Opioid Misuse Epidemic" conference (funding covers conference attendance).

William C. Miller, Chair and Professor in the Division of Epidemiology, recently received a National Institute on Drug Abuse UG3 entitled "Implementing a Community-Based Response to the Opioid Epidemic in Rural Ohio" in the amount of $1,147,821.

Haikady Nagaraja, Professor Emeritus in the Division of Biostatistics, recently received a Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital award entitled "MHC complement variants in disease susceptibility of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies" in the amount of $8,552.

Julianna Nemeth, Assistant Professor of Practice in the Division of Health Behavior and Health Promotion, recently received a National Cancer Institute K07 award entitled "Development of a contextually tailored and optimized smoking cessation intervention for homeless youth" in the amount of $650,325.

Megan Roberts, Assistant Professor in the Division of Health Behavior and Health Promotion, recently received a National Cancer Institute R21 award entitled "Evaluating how licensing-law strategies will change neighborhood disparities in tobacco retailer density" in the amount of $323,458.

Julie Robbins, Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Health Services Management and Policy, recently received an American College of Health Executives award entitled "ACHE CEO Survey" in the amount of $25,000.

Andy Wapner, Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of the Center for Public Health Practice, recently received an award from Columbia University entitled "Webinars for NY State Association of County Health Officials" in the amount of $4,700.

Andy Wapner, Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of the Center for Public Health Practice, recently received an award from Gallia County Health Department entitled "Gallia County Strategic Planning" in the amount of $6,400.