Graduate and Undergraduate Program Competencies

The faculty of the College of Public Health has established competencies for all its graduate degrees (MPH; MHA; MS; PhD) and programs and specializations. The competencies are based on information gathered from applicable professional organizations including the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health; Institute of Medicine), information from external advisory committees and employers, and, applicable governmental standards or professional guidelines.

The learning objectives for the required core and specialization courses are aligned with these competencies. The assessment process for assuring that successful learners and graduates meet the desired competencies include objective and subjective quizzes and examinations, research papers, problem-sets, specialized practicum, culminating projects, student/graduate surveys, and employer surveys.

The competencies are listed below, organized by degree program. For the MPH degree, the core competencies for all graduates are listed first, followed by those for the specializations.

Graduate Degree Programs

Foundational Public Health Knowledge Objectives

All graduates of the MHA, MPH, MS and PhD degree programs will be prepared to:

Profession & Science of Public Health

  1. Explain public health history, philosophy and values
  2. Identify the core functions of public health and the 10 Essential Services
  3. Explain the role of quantitative and qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population’s health
  4. List major causes and trends of morbidity and mortality in the US or other community relevant to the school or program
  5. Discuss the science of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention in population health, including health promotion, screening, etc.
  6. Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge

Factors Related to Human Health

  1. Explain effects of environmental factors on a population’s health
  2. Explain biological and genetic factors that affect a population’s health
  3. Explain behavioral and psychological factors that affect a population’s health
  4. Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities
  5. Explain how globalization affects global burdens of disease
  6. Explain the ecological perspective on the connections among human, animal and ecosystem health (e.g., One Health)

MPH Degree Foundational Public Health Competencies

All graduates of the MPH degree programs will be prepared to:

Evidence-based Approaches to Public Health

  1. Apply epidemiological methods to the breadth of settings and situations in public health practice
  2. Select quantitative and qualitative data collection methods appropriate for a given public health context
  3. Analyze quantitative and qualitative data using biostatistics, informatics, computer-based programming and software, as appropriate
  4. Interpret results of data analysis for public health research, policy or practice

Public Health & Health Care Systems

  1. Compare the organization, structure and function of health care, public health and regulatory systems across national and international settings 
  2. Discuss the means by which structural bias, social inequities and racism undermine health and create challenges to achieving health equity at organizational, community and societal levels 

Planning & Management to Promote Health

  1. Assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities’ health 
  2. Apply awareness of cultural values and practices to the design or implementation of public health policies or programs 
  3. Design a population-based policy, program, project or intervention 
  4. Explain basic principles and tools of budget and resource management 
  5. Select methods to evaluate public health programs 

Policy in Public Health

  1. Discuss multiple dimensions of the policy-making process, including the roles of ethics and evidence 
  2. Propose strategies to identify stakeholders and build coalitions and partnerships for influencing public health outcomes 
  3. Advocate for political, social or economic policies and programs that will improve health in diverse populations 
  4. Evaluate policies for their impact on public health and health equity

Leadership

  1. Apply principles of leadership, governance and management, which include creating a vision, empowering others, fostering collaboration and guiding decision making
  2. Apply negotiation and mediation skills to address organizational or community challenges

Communication

  1. Select communication strategies for different audiences and sectors
  2. Communicate audience-appropriate public health content, both in writing and through oral presentation
  3. Describe the importance of cultural competence in communicating public health content 

Interprofessional Practice

  1. Perform effectively on interprofessional teams

Systems Thinking

  1. Apply systems thinking tools to a public health issue

MPH Specialization Competencies

 Biomedical Informatics

Upon graduation, a successful student with an MPH degree specialization in Biomedical Informatics will be able to:

  1. compare and contrast types of major domestic and international public health issues, including sources/causes of infectious/chronic diseases, transmission, risk factors, morbidity and mortality;
  2. discuss various approaches/strategies for identification, response and intervention to address and attempt to resolve common public health issues;
  3. identify genetic, social, political, cultural, behavioral, socioeconomic, demographic and ethical factors and relationships to domestic and international public health issues and determinants of health;
  4. access  data sources (e.g., databases) commonly used for biomedical informatics;
  5. discuss core biomedical informatics theories, methods, and practice areas from individual and population-based perspectives;
  6. interpret applicable research articles; and,
  7. apply principles of ethics for professional practice and responsible conduct of research.

 Biostatistics

Upon graduation, a successful student with an MPH degree specialization in Biostatistics will be able to:

  1. Address problems arising in public health and medicine through appropriate statements of hypotheses, study design, data collection, data management, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results.
  2. Recognize strengths and weaknesses of study designs and data sources commonly encountered in public health.
  3. Identify strengths and weaknesses of standard analytic methods.
  4. Describe basic concepts of probability, random variation and commonly used statistical probability distributions
  5. Use computational methods to effectively analyze complex public health and medical data.

 Clinical Translational Science

Upon graduation, a successful student with an MPH degree specialization in Clinical Translational Science will be able to:

  1. design a clinical investigation relevant to the student’s field of clinical specialty, including the definition of study aims and objectives and the creation of an appropriate study design;
  2. collaboratively prepare a grant application to seek funding for a clinical investigation project;
  3. use decision analysis and relevant evaluation methods to examine issues of appropriate implementation of treatments or technologies;
  4. recognize ethical issues that are likely to arise in clinical investigations and the procedures for handling them appropriately;
  5. apply ethical principles to the conduct of clinical investigations, with special emphasis on protection of research subjects; and,
  6. prepare a manuscript suitable for publication and/or for reporting to a sponsor on the conduct and results of a clinical investigation.

 Environmental Health Sciences

Upon graduation, a successful student with an MPH degree specialization in Environmental Health Sciences will be able to:

  1. explain the significance of the community and workplace environment to public health;
  2. outline the health challenges that natural and anthropogenic contaminants in the environment can pose to population health;
  3. explain the physiological factors that influence human exposure and the uptake of chemical and biological environmental agents;
  4. identify and explain individual (e.g., genetic, physiologic and psychosocial) and community (e.g., social, built, economic, race) susceptibility factors that heighten the risk for populations for adverse health outcomes from environmental hazards;
  5. apply various risk assessment, risk management and risk communication approaches for environmental hazards;
  6. explain exposure and  the underlying mechanisms of toxicity and infectivity resulting from chemical, biological and physical  agents;
  7. describe federal and state regulatory programs, guidelines and authorities relevant to environmental and occupational health;
  8. access state, federal, and local resources for assessing environmental and occupational health;
  9. compare the principle components and influencing factors in the exposure continuum from source to disease; and,
  10. determine the role of exposure assessment in environmental and occupational health.

 Epidemiology

Upon graduation, a successful student with an MPH degree specialization in Epidemiology will be able to:

  1. design a survey to examine a public health problem or for use in an epidemiologic investigation;
  2. choose the correct analysis for data obtained from an epidemiologic investigation, including data from surveys, matched and unmatched case-control studies, cohort studies, and clinical trials;
  3. analyze and interpret data obtained from an epidemiologic investigation, including data from surveys, matched and unmatched case-control studies, cohort studies, and clinical trials;
  4. assess confounding and effect modification in data from an epidemiologic investigation;
  5. demonstrate familiarity with the basic content and issues in at least two substantive areas of application in epidemiology (e.g., cardiovascular epidemiology, cancer epidemiology, chronic disease epidemiology, infectious disease epidemiology, injury epidemiology);
  6. identify the natural histories of major types of disease and their relevance to epidemiologic investigations; and,
  7. use appropriate computer software for the management and analysis of epidemiologic data;

 Health Behavior and Health Promotion

Upon graduation, a successful student with an MPH degree specialization in Health Promotion and Health Behavior will be able to:

  1. Explain the history, scope, and philosophical basis of public health education.
  2. Critically assess the evidence linking behavioral and psychosocial factors to health and illness.
  3. Apply behavioral and social science theory to the development and implementation of health promotion and disease prevention programs at multiple targets and different levels of intervention (intrapersonal, interpersonal, and community).
  4. Critically assess the scientific literature describing health promotion interventions.
  5. Identify mechanisms to secure funding, manage and administer health promotion and disease prevention programs so as to ensure optimal program delivery.
  6. Design and carry out process evaluation for the improvement of health promotion programs.
  7. Collaboratively design and carry out outcome evaluations of health promotion programs.
  8. Apply ethical principles to the planning and evaluation of social and behavioral change efforts.
  9. Demonstrate cultural competency when planning health promotion and disease prevention activities.
  10. Recognize the importance of health literacy in creating and/or evaluating health promotion and disease prevention materials.
  11. Explain how health promotion efforts enable communities to influence their own well-being.
  12. Anticipate challenges and opportunities in working collaboratively with communities.

 Program for Experienced Professionals – Population Health Management and Leadership:

Upon graduation, a successful student with an MPH degree concentration in Population Health Management and Leadership will be able to:

  1. Apply concepts of population health science to describe roles of public health, healthcare and community partners in improving population health outcomes.
  2. Discuss current health policy issues using appropriate economic perspectives
  3. Apply key elements of microeconomic concepts to the analysis of health care cases.
  4. Use needs analysis data to develop strategic approaches to support goal achievement.
  5. Use systems-thinking and analytic methods to assess operations performance and improve organizational processes.
  6. Apply quality improvement methods to create and sustain PHM and public health program improvements.
  7. Apply evidence-based decision-making techniques to understand population health concerns and assess population health programs.

 Veterinary Public Health

Upon graduation, a successful student with an MPH degree specialization in Veterinary Public Health will be able to:

  1. Describe common zoonotic and foodborne infectious diseases, with respect to their etiology and epidemiology especially those classified as reportable, bioterrorism threats, or have a major impact on public health and/or agriculture;
  2. Identify the major pathways for transmission of zoonotic agents and foodborne hazards to humans, as well as the reservoirs for many common pathogens;
  3. Identify methods and instruments for collecting and transporting valid and reliable samples, determine the appropriate diagnostic technique for human, animal, arthropod, food product, and/or environmental specimens, and provide an accurate interpretation of the results;
  4. Identify methods and programs utilized to prevent, control and/or eradicate zoonotic and foodborne diseases, including pre- and post-harvest interventions;
  5. Evaluate the integrity of emergency preparedness programs, including biosecurity, biocontainment, and natural disaster response plans;
  6. Review and apply methods for planning, initiating and conducting case and outbreak investigations of zoonotic and foodborne diseases;
  7. Recognize applicable regulations and laws governing zoonotic diseases, food safety and security, or foreign animal diseases, and the agencies with authority to enforce these laws;
  8. Define the role of epidemiology in maintaining human and animal health; and identify strategies in the design and conduct of surveillance, monitoring, and epidemiological studies that assess the prevalence and distribution of zoonotic and foodborne diseases;
  9. Analyze approaches for assessing and controlling environmental and biological agents and strategies for reducing risks to human and animal health, especially in agricultural settings.
  10. Conduct comprehensive literature reviews of the scientific evidence related to a veterinary public health issue, concern, or intervention.
  11. Use individual, team, and organizational learning opportunities for personal and professional development.

Master of Health Administration (MHA) Professional Degree Competencies

Upon graduation, a successful student with an MHA degree specialization in Health Administration will be able to do the following:

  1. Organizational Management.  Assess opportunities to improve health services organizations through application of organizational theories and organization development principles. 
  2. Organizational Structure and Governance.  Analyze how organizational and environmental factors shape the structure of health care organizations and the roles, responsibilities and influence of governing bodies. 
  3. Workforce and Organizational Development.  Apply methods and techniques for organizational, employee, and professional staff development that ensure a diverse and high performing work force. 
  4. Operations Assessment and Improvement.  Use systems-thinking and analytic methods to assess operations performance and improve organizational processes.
  5. Clinical Quality Assessment and improvement. Apply principles of quality improvement in the context of clinical performance. 
  6. Information Technology Management and Assessment.  Analyze the value, risks and opportunities of information technology and associated data for improving performance of health organizations and the broader health system. 
  7. Strategic and Business Planning.  Perform environmental, market, and community needs analyses, develop strategic alternatives, formulate strategic goals, and develop programs, business plans, and implementation strategies to support goal achievement
  8. Financial Management.  Explain financial and accounting information, prepare and manage budgets, and evaluate investment decisions. 
  9. Economic Analysis.  Analyze and apply economic theory and concepts for decision-making. 
  10. Health Care Issues and Trends.  Explain important issues in health care, including circumstances causing major changes and reform in U.S. health care delivery. 
  11. Health Policy.  Describe the public policy process related to health care, including the creation and implementation of policy and the political aspects of policy and articulate the impact on the delivery of health services. 
  12. Health Care Legal Principles. Recognize legal issues that may arise in health care delivery and business settings and respond appropriately. 
  13. Population Health. Use epidemiological, market, patient outcome, and organizational performance data to improve quality, and manage financial and other risks associated with defined populations. 
  14. Leadership and Change Management.  Develop effective leadership approaches to communicate a vision, motivate stakeholders, build consensus, and lead organizational change efforts. 
  15. Impact and Influence. Shape opinions, processes, or outcomes through example, persuasive communication, or use of informal power. 
  16. Professional Development. Demonstrate a commitment to continuous learning and self-improvement through reflection, goal setting, self-assessment, and the cultivation of professional networks. 
  17. Collaboration and Working in Teams.  Work cooperatively with others, create, participate on, and lead teams, including inter-professional. 
  18. Personal and Professional Ethics.   Apply ethical principles, social and professional values to analyze managerial, organizational and policy situations; demonstrate professional values and ethics.
  19. Critical Thinking. Evaluate a situation, issue, or idea by understanding and challenging assumptions, considering competing points of view, and anticipating potential effects within and beyond the health care system. 
  20. Written Communication. Write in a clear, logical manner and prepare effective business communications.
  21. Verbal Communication. Demonstrate effective oral communication and presentation skills.
  22. Quantitative Skills.  Analyze data and interpret quantitative information for organization decision making.
  23. Project Management.  Design, plan, implement, and assess projects and develop appropriate timelines related to performance, structure and outcomes. 
  24. Performance MeasurementIdentify and use data within organizations to improve performance.
  25. Problem-Solving and Decision-Making. Use multiple methods and sources to seek comprehensive information, generate creative new solutions—or adapt previous solutions—and apply structured decision-making techniques and tools to address health care questions.

Master of Science (MS) Specialization competencies

Biomedical Informatics

Upon graduation, a successful student with a MS degree specialization in Biomedical Informatics will be able to:

    1. Explain how the core public health concepts of biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, health behavior/health promotion, and health administration relate to the student’s area of specialization.
    2. Synthesize literature in student’s area of specialization relative to their thesis topic and its importance for public health.
    3. Summarize relevant theories and conceptual models that inform their research.
    4. Conduct a research project using appropriate research methods and ethical approaches.
    5. Prepare a thesis summarizing the research project and interpreting the results.
    6. Communicate in writing and orally a research project’s methods, results, limitations, conclusions and public health relevance.
    7. Utilize existing knowledge sources (e.g. databases) commonly used for biomedical informatics research and applications.
    8. Discuss core biomedical informatics concepts, methods, and practice areas from individual and population-based perspectives.
    9. Apply biomedical informatics methods to address challenges in the field of public health.

Biostatistics

Upon graduation, a successful student with a MS degree specialization in Biostatistics will be able to:

    1. Explain how the core public health concepts of biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, health behavior/health promotion, and health administration relate to the student’s area of specialization.
    2. Synthesize literature in student’s area of specialization relative to their thesis topic and its importance for public health.
    3. Summarize relevant theories and conceptual models that inform their research.
    4. Conduct a research project using appropriate research methods and ethical approaches.
    5. Prepare a thesis summarizing the research project and interpreting the results.
    6. Communicate in writing and orally a research project’s methods, results, limitations, conclusions and public health relevance.
    7. Address problems arising in public health and medicine through appropriate statements of hypotheses, study design, data collection, data management, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results.
    8. Recognize strengths and weaknesses of study designs, data sources, and analytic methods.
    9. Explain core concepts of probability, random variation and commonly used statistical probability distributions and how they relate to statistical inference.
    10. Use computational methods to effectively analyze complex public health and medical data.

Environmental Public Health

Upon graduation, a successful student with a MS degree in Environmental Science with specialization in Environmental Public Health will be able to:

    1. Explain how the core public health concepts of biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, health behavior/health promotion, and health administration relate to the student’s area of specialization.
    2. Synthesize literature in student’s area of specialization relative to their thesis topic and its importance for public health.
    3. Summarize relevant theories and conceptual models that inform their research.
    4. Conduct a research project using appropriate research methods and ethical approaches.
    5. Prepare a thesis summarizing the research project and interpreting the results.
    6. Communicate in writing and orally a research project’s methods, results, limitations, conclusions and public health relevance.
    7. Explain individual and community susceptibility and vulnerability factors that heighten the risk for populations for adverse health outcomes from environmental hazards.
    8. Apply the environmental health paradigm (i.e., EHS Model) to characterizing hazardous physical, chemical and
      biological agents relative to sources, categories, exposure matrices/pathways, distribution, human exposures, responses, societal/regulatory actions, and technological controls.
    9. Work with various stakeholders and other professions to proactively and reactively address environmental and occupational regulatory, policy and human health issues and concerns.

Epidemiology

Upon graduation, a successful student with a MS degree specialization in Epidemiology will be able to:

    1. Explain how the core public health concepts of biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, health behavior/health promotion, and health administration relate to the student’s area of specialization.
    2. Synthesize literature in student’s area of specialization relative to their thesis topic and its importance for public health.
    3. Summarize relevant theories and conceptual models that inform their research.
    4. Conduct a research project using appropriate research methods and ethical approaches.
    5. Prepare a thesis summarizing the research project and interpreting the results.
    6. Communicate in writing and orally a research project’s methods, results, limitations, conclusions and public health relevance.
    7. Identify and understand the impact of potential sources of bias, including selection bias, measurement error, and confounding, in epidemiological studies.
    8. Demonstrate familiarity with the content and issues in at least one substantive epidemiological topic.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Degree specialization competencies

Public Health Biostatistics

Upon graduation, successful students with a PhD degree in Biostatistics with specialization in Public Health are expected to be able to:

  1. Understand the theoretical foundations of statistical methods
  2. Critique general scientific research articles and assess the appropriateness of the statistical applications and methodology involved
  3. Work effectively and collaboratively in a team on a biological or health-related scientific question
  4. Design biological or health-related research studies and construct and implement statistical analysis plans
    appropriate for such studies
  5. Effectively communicate the results of statistical analyses to statistical and non-statistical audiences
  6. Review and critique existing literature in students’ general area of specialization, and can identify gaps in
    that literature
  7. Make a contribution to biostatistical methodology and/or practice

Environmental Public Health (Interdisciplinary via ESGP):

Upon graduation, a successful student with a PhD degree in Environmental Science with specialization in Environmental Public Health will be able to:

  1. Explain how the core public health concepts of biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, health behavior/health promotion, and health administration relate to the student’s area of specialization.
  2. Synthesize and critique existing literature in student’s area of specialization to identify gaps in the evidence base and justify their importance for public health.
  3. Apply relevant theories and conceptual models to inform and ground research design and interpretation.
  4. Formulate hypotheses, plan and conduct a research study using appropriate research methods, and ethical approaches.
  5. Analyze data and prepare an original manuscript, suitable for publication, summarizing the results and interpreting the findings from a research study.
  6. Communicate in writing and orally a research study’s purpose, methods, results, limitations, conclusions and public health relevance to both informed and lay audiences.
  7. Quantify individual and community susceptibility and vulnerability factors that heighten the risk for populations for adverse health outcomes from environmental hazards.
  8. Apply the environmental health paradigm (i.e., EHS Model) to characterizing hazardous physical, chemical and biological agents relative to sources, categories, exposure matrices/pathways, distribution, human exposures, responses, societal/regulatory actions, and technological controls.
  9. Work with various stakeholders and other professions to proactively and reactively address environmental and occupational regulatory, policy and human health issues and concerns.

Epidemiology

Upon graduation, a successful student with a PhD degree specialization in Epidemiology will be able to:

    1. Explain how the core public health concepts of biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, health behavior/health promotion, and health administration relate to the student’s area of specialization.
    2. Synthesize and critique existing literature in student’s area of specialization to identify gaps in the evidence base and justify their importance for public health.
    3. Apply relevant theories and conceptual models to inform and ground research design and interpretation.
    4. Formulate hypotheses, plan and conduct a research study using appropriate research methods, and ethical approaches.
    5. Analyze data and prepare an original manuscript, suitable for publication, summarizing the results and interpreting the findings from a research study.
    6. Communicate in writing and orally a research study’s purpose, methods, results, limitations, conclusions and public health relevance to both informed and lay audiences.
    7. Identify and address potential sources of bias, including selection bias, measurement error, and confounding, in both the design and analysis phases of epidemiological studies.
    8. Demonstrate familiarity with the content and issues in at least one specific substantive area of epidemiology.

Health Behavior and Health Promotion

Upon graduation, a successful student with a PhD degree specialization in Health Behavior and Health Promotion will be able to:

    1. Explain how the core public health concepts of biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, health behavior/health promotion, and health administration relate to the student’s area of specialization.
    2. Synthesize and critique existing literature in student’s area of specialization to identify gaps in the evidence base and justify their importance for public health.
    3. Apply relevant theories and conceptual models to inform and ground research design and interpretation.
    4. Formulate hypotheses, plan and conduct a research study using appropriate research methods, and ethical approaches.
    5. Analyze data and prepare an original manuscript, suitable for publication, summarizing the results and interpreting the findings from a research study.
    6. Communicate in writing and orally a research study’s purpose, methods, results, limitations, conclusions and public health relevance to both informed and lay audiences.
    7. Critically assess methods for involving diverse communities in research.
    8. Apply principles of behavioral science to the design of public health interventions.
    9. Critically assess strengths and limitations of theories used in public health behavior change interventions.

Health Services Management and Policy

Upon graduation, a successful student with a PhD degree specialization in Health Services Management and Policy will be able to:

    1. Explain how the core public health concepts of biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, health behavior/health promotion, and health administration relate to the student’s area of specialization.
    2. Synthesize and critique existing literature in student’s area of specialization to identify gaps in the evidence base and justify their importance for public health.
    3. Apply relevant theories and conceptual models to inform and ground research design and interpretation.
    4. Formulate hypotheses, plan and conduct a research study using appropriate research methods, and ethical approaches.
    5. Analyze data and prepare an original manuscript, suitable for publication, summarizing the results and interpreting the findings from a research study.
    6. Communicate in writing and orally a research study’s purpose, methods, results, limitations, conclusions and public health relevance to both informed and lay audiences.
    7. Critically assess the key institutions and system relationships within the US health system.
    8. Critically assess relevant health management and policy theories and concepts as applied in health systems research.
    9. Apply appropriate statistical techniques to enhance causal inference and to address the problems that arise in health systems research relying on observational data.

Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) Degree

Foundational Domains

  1. the history and philosophy of public health as well as its core values, concepts and functions across the globe and in society
  2. the basic concepts, methods and tools of public health data collection, use and analysis and why evidence-based approaches are an essential part of public health practice
  3. the concepts of population health, and the basic processes, approaches and interventions that identify and address the major health-related needs and concerns of populations
  4. the underlying science of human health and disease, including opportunities for promoting and protecting health across the life course
  5. the socioeconomic, behavioral, biological, environmental and other factors that impact human health and contribute to health disparities
  6. the fundamental concepts and features of project implementation, including planning, assessment and evaluation
  7. the fundamental characteristics and organizational structures of the US health system as well as the differences between systems in other countries
  8. basic concepts of legal, ethical, economic and regulatory dimensions of health care and public health policy and the roles, influences and responsibilities of the different agencies and branches of government
  9. basic concepts of public health-specific communication, including technical and professional writing and the use of mass media and electronic technology

Cross-Cutting Concepts

  1. advocacy for protection and promotion of the public’s health at all levels of society
  2. community dynamics
  3. critical thinking and creativity
  4. cultural contexts in which public health professionals work
  5. ethical decision making as related to self and society
  6. independent work and a personal work ethic
  7. networking
  8. organizational dynamics
  9. professionalism
  10. research methods
  11. systems thinking
  12. teamwork and leadership

Foundational Competencies

All graduates of the BSPH degree program will be prepared to:

  1. summarize the historic milestones in public health;
  2. compare and contrast examples of major domestic and international public health issues;
  3. discuss approaches and strategies  to identify, respond to and  intervene  with attempt to resolve common public health issues;
  4. identify political, cultural, behavioral and socioeconomic factors related to global public health issues; and,
  5. apply the fundamental principles of the five core disciplines of public health (biostatistics; environmental health; epidemiology; health administration; health behavior/promotion) to domestic and international population issues.
  6. the ability to communicate public health information, in both oral and written forms, through a variety of media and to diverse audiences
  7. the ability to locate, use, evaluate and synthesize public health information

Environmental Public Health Specialization Competencies

In addition to the public health foundational competencies, graduates of the BSPH degree program with interdisciplinary specialization in Environmental Public Health will be prepared to:

  1. Apply principles of math, chemistry, biology to applied science of environmental public health.
  2. Use the Environmental Science Health model to explain environmentally-related exposures and human diseases.
  3. Summarize management, technical measures and approaches to reduce and prevent environmentally-related human diseases.

Public Health Sociology Specialization Competencies

In addition to the public health foundational competencies, graduates of the BSPH degree program with interdisciplinary specialization in Public Health Sociology will be prepared to:

  1. Employ specific sociological theories, both classical and contemporary, to explain the unequal distribution of health among different subpopulations in the United States and throughout the world. Identify how these theories can extend our knowledge of disease processes and prevention and intervention opportunities beyond typical public health perspectives. 
  2. Interpret population health patterns using rigorous methods of sociological inquiry that stem from both qualitative and quantitative reasoning, augmenting what public health researchers and practitioners typically use. 
  3. Illustrate how sociological perspectives of stratification - particularly along the lines of race, class, and gender – expand typical public health perceptions and approaches.
  4. Identify social and public policies that differentially affect the unequal distribution of health in society as well as the social process that led to their creation and keep them in place.